On-Demand Presentations

On-Demand presentations - Register and receive an e-mail with a link for immediate access to the presentation.  The presentation plays back on your computer and the audio plays through your speakers.  Access to the online recording is available for one year after date of purchase.

Webinar and Session Recordings

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register

    In an age of communication overload, regulators must find new ways to engage and inform the public about who we are and what we do. What are the best ways to reach people? What messages will get through? How do you measure results? In 2013, the Ontario College of Teachers embarked on a comprehensive public awareness initiative, including bilingual print, radio and online campaigns, to educate the public about its role. The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario also pursued an ambitious social media campaign to educate new audiences and engage key influencers in the health care field. Join us to learn how these organizations successfully raised the bar for public awareness, using tangible and measurable results to communicate effectively with the broader community.


    Originally presented: March 29, 2017


    Presenters:

    Jill Hefley, Associate Director, Communications, College of Physicians & Surgeons of Ontario
    Richard Lewko, Director of Corporate and Council Services, Ontario College of Teachers

    Michael Salvatori, Chief Executive Officer and Registrar, Ontario College of Teachers

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register
    What is regulatory excellence? How can you measure it? What indicators can tell you if your regulatory body is performing at the excellent, basic, or worst of all, below basic level? Some professions bring their discipline’s perspective to challenges such as assessing performance as a regulatory body. When it came to assessing its performance, the Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA) used an approach inspired by behavioral rating methodology. This framework was used by an external expert and by an internal working group comprised of board members. The focus of this presentation is not so much the results of the audit but the effectiveness of the process and its usefulness in assessing and improving regulatory performance.


    Learning Objectives:
    • Learn about an innovative and adaptable approach to assessing performance as a regulator
    • Learn from HRPA’s own experience in using the Professional Regulation Practices Audit framework and process
    • See how internal and external assessments of performance as a regulatory body can differ and what that may mean

    • Learn how you could adapt and use this tool back home


    Originally presented: April 19, 2017


    Presenter:

    Claude Balthazard, Vice-President, Regulatory Affairs and Registrar, Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA)
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register

    In 2014, three nursing regulators and a care aide registry in British Columbia partnered with key stakeholders to develop integrated competency assessment tools for the evaluation of internationally educated professionals. With funding from government, the tools help assure the regulators and care aide registry of the skills, knowledge and abilities of international applicants. In addition, the tools help stream applicants into the most appropriate nursing role as quickly as possible.


    Originally presented: May 10, 2017


    Presenters:

    Bruce Bell, Manager, BC Care Aide & Community Health Worker Registry
    Lynn Cairns, Chief Officer, Registration, Inquiry, and Discipline, College of Registered Nurses of BC
    Fiona Ramsay
    , Registrar, College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC
    Sara Telfer
    , Deputy Registrar/Director of Regulatory Services, College of Licensed Practical Nurses of BC
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register

    In a time of limited resources and expanding workloads, we are often tempted to think that the professional discipline process is complete once the final order or settlement agreement is signed. But providing effective oversight of practitioners after they have been disciplined is essential if professional regulation is to produce the desired result - improved licensee performance. How do we establish oversight systems that can provide us with meaningful information about licensee compliance and performance improvement? And how do we ensure that the information we get, whether from internal or external sources, is objective and reliable? This session will explore recent initiatives at both the federal and state levels in the United States and compare them with approaches taken in Australia in an effort to identify potentially useful guidance for promoting objectivity and effectiveness in post-disciplinary oversight mechanisms in all jurisdictions.


    Originally presented: May 15, 2017


    Presenters:

    Jim Anliot, Director of Healthcare Compliance Services, Affiliated Monitors

    Jim O'Dempsey, National Director, Compliance, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register
    Evidence-based healthcare workforce policy requires sound, empirical data that is specifically designed to answer key questions. Policy decision-makers and researchers need a reliable resource of information on the number, demographics, practice location and other characteristics of licensees who provide healthcare services. Unfortunately, the existing body of research is small, lacks consistent methodologies and definitions, and addresses disjointed topic areas.


    Licensing boards can play a crucial role in surveying licensees through licensure renewal to collect meaningful, standard minimum data sets that are comparable within and across professions, locations, and over time. This webinar brings together a panel of best practices workforce policy research experts to share insights from one state’s initiative to show what agencies can do, to discuss the significance of healthcare workforce data for policy and planning and to provide information on technical assistance on data collection and analysis.


    This webinar is in follow-up to a session by the same title presented at the 2016 Annual Educational Conference in Portland and will provide additional examples of how this licensing board research is leveraged to support policy and planning initiatives, grants, professional pipeline development and more.


    Originally presented: July 19, 2017


    Presenters:

    Elizabeth Carter, Director, Virginia Dept. of Health Professions Healthcare Workforce Data Center
    Jean Moore, Director, Center for Health Workforce Studies
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register
    Traditionally, scholars believed that occupational licenses, such as medical licensing for doctors, reduced the number of people who could get into the occupation. This limit on the supply of workers was believed to result in increased wages for the workers that made it in. However, it turns out that the opposite is true! Using more than 15 million observations over 30 years of the Current Population Survey, researcher Beth Redbird has found that the licensing process actually increases access, particularly for underrepresented groups (women and racial minorities).


    Even more interesting, occupational entry barriers change the face of an occupation – who gets a job and what they do at work. We might expect serious occupational entry standards, like a bar exam for paralegals or a school requirement for massage therapists, would make it more difficult to enter the occupation, but it actually facilitates entry. Informal barriers, which tend to encourage discrimination and homogeneity, are replaced with formal procedures, which have a greater potential to be color-blind and can be standardized, measured, and publicized. The new “free market” of labor, following the decline of unions, has given way to a new institutional form of closure that has a startling effect on who gets which jobs.


    Originally presented: August 30, 2017


    Presenter:

    Beth Redbird, Assistant Professor, Northwestern University
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register

    In order for regulators to achieve excellence they must be aware of the legal framework in which they operate, particularly the judge-made legal framework that changes with each important new case that is decided. We will summarize and analyze the most interesting recent cases involving regulatory law, pulling together themes and highlighting differences between various jurisdictions including discipline, registration and human rights issues. Get up to date on the most recent cases of interest to regulators and learn how to apply the principles from those cases to your organization’s practices.


    Originally presented: November 15, 2017


    Presenters:

    Amigo Wade, Virginia Division of Legislative Services

    Bernard LeBlanc, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

    Rebecca Durcan, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register
    How can regulators influence members’ behavior? This session explores how behavioral sciences are being applied within organizations world-wide. The former lead of the Government of Ontario’s Behavioral Insights Unit will provide an overview of key behavioral science concepts. Governing more than 50,000 professionals, the College of Early Childhood Educators is the only self-regulating body of its kind in North America. A case study will further illustrate how this College has applied a behavioral lens to examine processes, identify opportunities for interventions, and test solutions. Session participants will also explore how to apply these concepts in their organizations.


    Learning Objectives:
    • Understand key behavioral science concepts and how they are being used in organizations around the world
    • Understand the important role of testing, data, and measurement when employing new or innovative approaches
    • Identify common behavioral barriers that can have an unintended negative impact on program outcomes
    • Apply a behavioral lens to their own organization's policies, processes and program using the Behavioral Diagnose and Design Approach
    • Develop an action place to test and measure solutions to behavioral problems

    Originally presented: January 24, 2018


    Presenters:

    Cynthia Abel, Director, Registration & Member Services, College of Early Childhood Educators, Toronto
    Saeed Walji, Deputy Registrar, College of Early Childhood Educators
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register
    A practitioner has been charged with a criminal offense. It is high profile and it is public. Tactical and public relations decisions will need to be made by the regulator immediately and on an ongoing basis, each critical to the regulator’s public interest role.


    This session will take the audience through a hypothetical scenario in which a practitioner has been charged with a serious criminal offense. Attendees will assume the role of the head of a regulatory body and think about the challenging questions that will face regulators at each step of the process when a practitioner faces criminal charges. As each tactical step is addressed, the panel will discuss the relevant law from across various jurisdictions and how regulators have reacted to similar situations. The differences in approach are both surprising and enlightening.


    Learning Objectives:
    • Learn the imperative action steps when a member has been charged with a criminal offense
    • Identify the relevant considerations for determining whether to proceed with the disciplinary process or wait for the criminal proceedings to be completed and how different jurisdictions around the world have addressed this issue
    • Learn how a criminal proceeding may impact the investigation of the allegations by the regulatory body. For example: Can or should the member be interviewed? What protections is the member likely to invoke, and how do these differ across jurisdictions? Should other witnesses be interviewed? Can the police be summonsed? Can you obtain the prosecution brief?
    • Learn how the disciplinary proceedings may impact the criminal proceedings and vice versa
    • Identify relevant considerations for determining whether to proceed with the disciplinary proceedings when the key evidence was

    Originally presented: February 7, 2018


    Presenters:

    Bernard C. LeBlanc, Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc
    Robin McKechney, Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

    Jan Robinson, Registrar and Chief Executive Officer, College of Veterinarians of Ontario

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Registration is closed


    CLEAR's 40th Annual 2020 conference was offered virtually - allowing increased participation from regulators worldwide, as we respond to the realities of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Conference content is developed by and for members of the regulatory community, with one aim: to promote regulatory excellence. The virtual conference delivered content in all four of our usual areas of focus:


    Compliance and Discipline

    Testing and Examinations

    Entry to Practice and Beyond

    Administration, Legislation and Policy


    View all recordings of the virtual event held in September 2020.


    CLEAR members will have access to all recordings as a member benefit at no charge.  Non-CLEAR members can access all recordings at a cost of $350.00.  Access to recordings will be available until May 28, 2021. 


    For more information or any questions, please contact Glenn Blind at gblind@clearhq.org

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    Good data is critical to support policy development, best practices, performance assessments, accountability, and decision making. Paul Craven, Superintendent of Professional Governance, will share his experience working with five regulatory bodies in British Columbia as they transition to the new Professional Governance Act (PGA). The presentation will cover examples of policy areas under development, identified data gaps, and expectations and authority for data collection. Standards of Good Regulation will also be discussed, including types of data to be tracked for each standard to support performance assessments and accountability.


    Originally presented: November 2020


    Presenter:

    Paul Craven, Superintendent of Professional Governance


    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    This webinar will focus on the use of data to make program and outcome changes. 


    Looking for a Better Data Plan?
    Superintendent of Real Estate Micheal Noseworthy will discuss how his office uses the data they have, as well as the data they don’t have, and the data they wish they had in their regulatory and oversight work. The possibilities of how data could be used in the future and what that means for both regulator and the regulated will be discussed.


    Data-Driven Process Change

    Director, Registration, Gillian Pichler will discuss how setting process goals based on empirical evidence and creating new data structures to support measurement of performance against these goals has transformed and expedited Engineers and Geoscientists BC’s assessment processes, while maintaining its standards for entry to licensure.


    Originally presented: January 2021


    Presenters:

    Gillian Pichler, Director, Registration, Engineers and Geoscientists British Columbia

    Micheal Noseworthy, Superintendent of Real Estate, British Columbia Office of the Superintendent of Real Estate


    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    On July 9, 2020, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer issued Executive Directive 2020-7, which requires the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs to promulgate administrative rules requiring all health care professionals to receive training on implicit bias and the way it affects the delivery of health care services. The rules are intended to establish implicit bias training standards as part of the knowledge and skills necessary for licensure, registration, and renewal of licenses and registrations of health professionals in Michigan. This webinar will provide an update on this initiative including stakeholder outreach efforts, content of the proposed rules, and remaining procedural steps prior to implementation.


    Originally presented: February 2021


    Presenter:

    Marlon Brown, Director, Policy & Legislative Affairs, Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs


    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    This presentation will provide a new methodology, a new metric, that can be useful for determining the thresholds to be followed in human service settings to prevent the spread of the COVID19 infection. This new metric, “Contact Hours,” takes into account the number of clients in a setting, the number of staff, the exposure time, and the available space. Contact hours are more effective than just using group size in determining the appropriate thresholds. It has the potential to provide the empirical base we have been lacking in our public policies related to COVID19 and for future pandemics.


    Originally presented: February 2021


    Presenter:

    Richard Fiene, Senior Research Psychologist, The Pennsylvania State University
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is the regulatory body for all nurses, midwives and nursing associates in the UK. We maintain a register of people who meet our requirements for registration, set and promote standards for education and lifelong learning and investigate serious concerns that are referred to us and, if needed, take action.


    As an organisation, we recognise that being the subject of a referral to the regulator can be a distressing experience, as the process of investigation can take some time and, in a small number of cases, can result in removal of their registration to practice. It can be especially difficult for those who don’t have a strong support network. To try to bridge that gap, we set up a telephone support service, the Careline, for those individuals who are under investigation. The Careline was launched in October 2019. As well as a telephone support line that is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, we also offer an online chat facility, access to online resources and access to structured counselling sessions when required. This presentation will summarize why such a service was required, the process for investigating fitness to practise concerns, and the implementation of the Careline, as well as how we feel the service has worked over the past 18 months.


    Originally presented: April 2021


    Presenters:

    Anthony Robinson, Assistant Director, Professional Regulation, UK Nursing and Midwifery Council
    Daniel Regan, Policy Manager, UK Nursing and Midwifery Council
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) is a United Kingdom-wide multi-professional regulator, regulating 15 different professions. We will explore what we have learned about our impact on the professionals we regulate and our move to a more upstream, preventative approach to regulation. With a focus on supporting registrant health and wellbeing, we will explore some of the challenges faced during the COVID-19 pandemic, some of the health and wellbeing resources developed for health and care professionals and our own Health and Wellbeing Strategy.


    Originally presented: May 2021


    Presenter:

    Kellie Green, Professionalism and Upstream Regulation Lead, The Health and Care Professions Council, UK
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    In 2020, many states and governors dealing with the COVID-related public health crisis created de facto reciprocity for various medical occupations to deal with the surge in demand for licensed professionals. Meanwhile, economic shutdownsboth state-enforced and market-drivenled to large declines in employment among licensed and unlicensed occupations alike. What changes to occupational licensing laws might persist beyond the pandemic, and which new ones are now more viable than before? Stephen Slivinski, senior research fellow at Arizona State University’s Center for the Study of Economic Liberty, will discuss how the past, present, and future of licensing reform and the economic research in the field to date relate in the context of these historic and unprecedented events.


    Originally presented: May 2021


    Presenter:

    Stephen Slivinski, Senior Research Fellow, Center for the Study of Economic Liberty, Arizona State University
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    This session discusses a shift in thinking, moving away from focusing on the accuracy of exam decisions to a focus on the accuracy of licensure decisions. Exam decisions look at the outcomes of single exams, whereas licensure decisions consider the entire exam process (including retake policies). This presentation will show, using simple probability theory, how this change in focus leads to startling conclusions: Truly qualified candidates almost never receive false-negative licensure decisions when they are allowed multiple retake opportunities. Highly reliable exams can have shockingly high false-positive licensure rates. Multiple exams of modest length and reliability can result in more accurate licensure decisions.


    The session content is appropriate for assessment professionals, policymakers, and administrators, in that it provides information on how to evaluate an assessment system with respect to its primary policy goal: increasing the accuracy of licensure decisions. Session attendees will learn about the concepts of reliability, decision consistency, and decision accuracy and how measures of these concepts are related. Attendees will learn how retake policies, while entirely appropriate, can drastically increase the likelihood of false positives when making licensure decisions. Finally, attendees will learn how more, shorter exams can improve accuracy while at the same time providing additional opportunities for candidate feedback and recognition (e.g., badging).


    Originally presented: July 2021


    Presenter:

    Brett Foley, Director, Professional Credentialing & Senior Psychometrician, Alpine Testing Solutions
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    The Pennsylvania Department of State conducted a year-long study on the effects of occupational licensure for veterans and military spouses. As part of the study, the Department surveyed over 200 veterans and military spouses, seeking their feedback on topics such as license portability, barriers to licensure, and the overall license application process. Findings from this research led to the development of policy recommendations targeted at creating more employment opportunities for this population while simultaneously increasing the number of qualified professionals practicing in Pennsylvania.


    Originally presented August 2021


    Speaker:

    Andrew LaFratte, Executive Policy Specialist for the Pennsylvania Department of State

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    Nursing regulatory colleges frequently receive questions about the roles of licensed practical nurses (LPN), registered nurses (RN) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPN) in specific practice settings. In today’s complex health care environment the answer to this question is multifaceted and requires the consideration of several factors.


    In order to address the scope of practice of three nursing professions the registrars of the three nursing regulatory colleges in Manitoba came together to collaborate on a solution. The conclusion of this work is a principle-based document that provides a framework for employers that truly provides for each profession to practice to their full scope of practice: "Nursing in a Team Environment."


    The session will discuss how the three regulators put aside long-held beliefs about rigid professional boundaries and collaborated to find a new approach. The registrars used the collaboration competencies from the National Interprofessional Competency Framework (2010) as a framework to guide their discussions as well as the Nursing in a Team Environment Document. The approaches used by the three registrars to establish a common understanding about scope of practice and the intersection between the three nursing professions will also be discussed.


    An innovative approach was used to develop both a model for assessment of team composition and a care continuum. The model for team composition assessment begins with determining the population health needs and culminates with client need. This considers the broad scope of health services that are required to provide safe, competent care that is required. The care continuum takes into account the context of care, the practice setting and amount of available support to the health care team and patient needs. These two models are brought together to provide appropriate care to the assessed needs. Questions based on the National Interprofessional Competency Framework competencies are included for employer consideration as they apply the frameworks. The document was tested by practice and education leaders to determine its efficacy in real life situations and is currently being utilized in a concerted effort to optimize the scopes of practice of all members of the health care team during the pandemic.


    Learning objectives:

    1. Attendees will learn how three nursing regulators used the National Interprofessional Competency Framework to reconceptualize boundaries between their professions

    2. Attendees will learn about a model for assessment of team composition

    3. Attendees will learn about regulators contribution to the health system


    Originally presented: August 2021


    Presenters:

    Deb Elias, Chief of Quality Practice, College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba

    Ryan Shymko, Practice Consultant/Deputy Registrar, College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of Manitoba

    Brenda Wohlgemuth, Education Programs Evaluations Consultant, College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    As part of a regulator's mandate is to maintain the public's trust and confidence in the profession, regulators are faced with the challenge of how to govern practitioners' off-duty conduct. A particularly timely and critical question is whether regulators can and should discipline practitioners for off-duty (or on-duty) conduct that results in the spread of misinformation or disinformation about the COVID-19 public health crisis. This webinar will address the legal perspective of disciplining off-duty conduct, a statement by the Federation of State Medical Boards about disciplining physicians who generate and spread COVID-19 vaccine misinformation and disinformation, and some specific case examples where practitioners have been disciplined for conduct that poses a risk to patients and public health during the COVID-19 pandemic.


    Originally presented October 2021


    Speakers:

    Robin McKechney, counsel, McCarthy Tetrault, Ontario

    David Abrahams, Senior Policy Lawyer, Legislation & Policy – Professional Regulation, Nursing and Midwifery Council, UK

    Katie Templeton, board member and chair of the Ethics and Professionalism Committee, Federation of State Medical Boards

    Ronne Hines, Director, Division of Professions and Occupations, Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies.

    Mark Steinagel, Division Director, Utah Department of Commerce
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    Internationally trained immigrants and refugees stand ready to contribute their valuable education and experience to the United States workforce. Yet, obtaining licensure in the U.S. can be a time-consuming, complicated, and expensive process, especially in highly regulated fields like health care, engineering, and education. In 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) funded a consortium of states to study occupational licensure issues and identify best practices and solutions to policies that create unnecessary barriers to labor market entry for disproportionately affected populations, including immigrants.


    World Education Services (WES), in collaboration with the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), the Council of State Governments (CSG), and the National Governors Association (NGA), is facilitating discussions among eight states on how to update licensure requirements to address barriers to licensure and create alternate pathways to licensure. These discussions also serve to highlight best practices and model policies aimed at reducing certain occupational licensing barriers and building more equitable licensing frameworks.


    This session will cover the preliminary findings of the working group. Presenters will share:

    • Best practices on how to approach and access licensure reform
    • Strategies that can be used by states seeking to create more inclusive workforces

    Originally presented October 2021


    Speakers:

    Mike Zimmer, Senior Policy Consultant, World Education Services (WES)

    Anne Head, Commissioner, Maine

    Mona Siddiqui, Senior Policy Advisor, Virginia

    Kit Taintorm, Senior Advisor for New American Integration, Colorado
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register

    In the regulatory context, the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is becoming increasingly commonplace for administrative decision making. This includes AI for registration, disciplinary and examination integrity purposes. However, there are several emerging legal and ethical considerations that must be considered when using AI. The majority of concerns lie in the unexplainable black box, meaning the “how” is not explainable or understandable.


    The purpose of this presentation is to outline the opportunities, threats and considerations of using AI in the regulatory context. This includes a number of considerations of administrative law such as transparency, impartiality, authority, and the role of discretion in decision making. In addition, there are several considerations related to the defensibility of AI-led decision making; especially as it relates to the justification and rationale of decisions.


    Although relatively new in the regulatory context, AI has been used for several years in online proctoring. In that time, the industry experienced significant learnings which have led to a reframing and evolution of the use of AI when proctoring high-stakes professional testing examinations. Based on several legal and ethical considerations, many best practices and recommendations from high stakes online proctoring could be readily applied to the regulatory field to enhance sound and defensible administrative decision making.


    Originally presented December 2021


    Speakers:

    Chris Beauchamp, Vice President, Psychometrics, Meazure Learning

    Lynsay Nair, Executive Director, Saskatchewan Association of Licensed Practical Nurses

    Ashley Norris, Chief Compliance Officer, Meazure Learning
    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback for one year
    Register


    This series starts with a CLEAR podcast episode - listen anytime at your convenience. The series continues with a 2-part webinar recording.


    As can be inferred from the title, the Questions a Legislator Should Ask series is designed to provide important questions to be asked, as well as background information, to assist policymakers in their deliberation of proposed new professional regulation as well as revisions to current statutes. Although not all of the questions may be applicable in all situations, the ones included will help guide legislators towards achieving the desired goal of creating legislation that protects the public from unscrupulous practitioners.


    This series of online conversations, as well as the book on which it is based (order here), can also be of value to legislative staff and regulators who may need to provide information to stakeholders. The background information will serve as a basis for understanding the benefits and liabilities of regulation. All professional regulation should focus on how the public’s health, safety, and welfare can be achieved. While the regulation may also benefit the profession being regulated, the primary purpose must be public protection.


    In this series, we will

    • Explain the purposes of statutes, rules/regulations, policies/guidelines
    • Outline the roles of and relationships among legislators, boards, division/departments
    • Provide questions to help identify and clarify the problem
    • Provide considerations for choosing the right tool for the job
    • Share tips for engaging the Executive branch, stakeholders, and public in implementation and beyond

    Speakers:

    Kara Schmitt, Questions a Legislator Should Ask author

    Sara Chambers, Director, AK Division of Corporations, Business and Professional Licensing

    Micah Matthews, Deputy Executive Director, Washington Medical Commission

    Ronne Hines, Director, Division of Professions and Occupations, Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies
    Alice M. Henley, General Counsel, Alabama Board of Nursing

    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register

    Setting up a consumer/public advisory group may seem daunting, but having a formal channel for engaging with this group can help regulators have a much better understanding about the issues that really matter to consumers and through this become better at what they do. In this webinar, you will find out more about how the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba, Canada, and the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) have approached setting up their consumer advisory groups, how they are supporting their groups to work well and what they have learned along the way.


    Originally presented: March 2018


    Presenters:

    Leanne Matthes, College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba
    Anita Rivera, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency


    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register
    The US medical specialty boards have traditionally represented best practice in rigorous recertification design - including components of self-assessment, Quality Improvement and re-examination. Now, due at least in part to significant practitioner pushback, there are no less than 16 current or proposed pilot programs for new kinds of physician specialty recertification. At the same time, other groups have introduced or are piloting recertification processes designed to support continuing competence and/or replace examinations. Come learn about some of these new products/processes and explore the Wild West of optimal recertification design!


    Learning Objectives:
    • Develop a working familiarity with current leading edge recertification programs
    • Learn about innovative ideas, new proposals for recertification components
    • Learn about newly implemented recertification models in a variety of professional settings

    Originally presented: April 2018


    Presenters:

    Grady Barnhill, Senior Assessment Advisor, National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants
    Christopher Butcher, Principal/CIO, Heuristic Solutions


    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register

    Litigation and enforcement procedures become the "go to" tool for many regulators because they are public and dramatic. But are they effective in advancing a regulator's strategic goals? Many tools, such as public education, industry education, audit and compliance reviews, business regulation, and other regulatory tools are often less expensive to administer and address root causes of regulatory failure. In this seminar, participants will learn a methodology for uncovering root causes to regulatory failure and be inspired to consider means to control those risks using methods other than enforcement.


    Originally presented: May 2018


    Presenter:

    Chilwin Cheng, Managing Partner, Ascendion Law


    • 06 Apr 2100
    • Virtual - view recording at your desktop - unlimited playback
    Register