On-Demand Presentations

On-Demand presentations - Register and receive an e-mail with a link for immediate access to the presentation.  The presentation plays back on your computer and the audio plays through your speakers.  Access to the online recording is available for one year after date of purchase.

Webinar and Session Recordings

    • 06 Apr 2100
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    How can regulators influence members’ behavior? This session explores how behavioral sciences are being applied within organizations world-wide. The former lead of the Government of Ontario’s Behavioral Insights Unit will provide an overview of key behavioral science concepts. Governing more than 50,000 professionals, the College of Early Childhood Educators is the only self-regulating body of its kind in North America. A case study will further illustrate how this College has applied a behavioral lens to examine processes, identify opportunities for interventions, and test solutions. Session participants will also explore how to apply these concepts in their organizations.


    Learning Objectives:
    • Understand key behavioral science concepts and how they are being used in organizations around the world
    • Understand the important role of testing, data, and measurement when employing new or innovative approaches
    • Identify common behavioral barriers that can have an unintended negative impact on program outcomes
    • Apply a behavioral lens to their own organization's policies, processes and program using the Behavioral Diagnose and Design Approach
    • Develop an action place to test and measure solutions to behavioral problems

    Originally presented: January 24, 2018


    Presenters:

    Cynthia Abel, Director, Registration & Member Services, College of Early Childhood Educators, Toronto
    Saeed Walji, Deputy Registrar, College of Early Childhood Educators
    • 06 Apr 2100
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    A practitioner has been charged with a criminal offense. It is high profile and it is public. Tactical and public relations decisions will need to be made by the regulator immediately and on an ongoing basis, each critical to the regulator’s public interest role.


    This session will take the audience through a hypothetical scenario in which a practitioner has been charged with a serious criminal offense. Attendees will assume the role of the head of a regulatory body and think about the challenging questions that will face regulators at each step of the process when a practitioner faces criminal charges. As each tactical step is addressed, the panel will discuss the relevant law from across various jurisdictions and how regulators have reacted to similar situations. The differences in approach are both surprising and enlightening.


    Learning Objectives:
    • Learn the imperative action steps when a member has been charged with a criminal offense
    • Identify the relevant considerations for determining whether to proceed with the disciplinary process or wait for the criminal proceedings to be completed and how different jurisdictions around the world have addressed this issue
    • Learn how a criminal proceeding may impact the investigation of the allegations by the regulatory body. For example: Can or should the member be interviewed? What protections is the member likely to invoke, and how do these differ across jurisdictions? Should other witnesses be interviewed? Can the police be summonsed? Can you obtain the prosecution brief?
    • Learn how the disciplinary proceedings may impact the criminal proceedings and vice versa
    • Identify relevant considerations for determining whether to proceed with the disciplinary proceedings when the key evidence was

    Originally presented: February 7, 2018


    Presenters:

    Bernard C. LeBlanc, Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc
    Robin McKechney, Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

    Jan Robinson, Registrar and Chief Executive Officer, College of Veterinarians of Ontario

    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Setting up a consumer/public advisory group may seem daunting, but having a formal channel for engaging with this group can help regulators have a much better understanding about the issues that really matter to consumers and through this become better at what they do. In this webinar, you will find out more about how the College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba, Canada, and the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) have approached setting up their consumer advisory groups, how they are supporting their groups to work well and what they have learned along the way.


    Originally presented: March 2018


    Presenters:

    Leanne Matthes, College of Registered Nurses of Manitoba
    Anita Rivera, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Litigation and enforcement procedures become the "go to" tool for many regulators because they are public and dramatic. But are they effective in advancing a regulator's strategic goals? Many tools, such as public education, industry education, audit and compliance reviews, business regulation, and other regulatory tools are often less expensive to administer and address root causes of regulatory failure. In this seminar, participants will learn a methodology for uncovering root causes to regulatory failure and be inspired to consider means to control those risks using methods other than enforcement.


    Originally presented: May 2018


    Presenter:

    Chilwin Cheng, Managing Partner, Ascendion Law


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    In an era where news headlines often scream that regulators make decisions that are kept from the public, the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario (RCDSO) has created a transparent risk assessment framework to be used by panels when considering complaints and other College investigations. The framework includes two tools: one used in making decisions about completed investigations and one used in making decisions about interim orders.


    Panels consider factors related to the standard of treatment provided by members, as well as whether members have undertaken any proactive remediation or demonstrated insight. The exercise of using risk assessment tools improves the development of reasons for panels’ decisions, and the incorporation of these reasons into written decisions improves transparency for the parties, all with a focus on patient safety.


    Originally presented: July 2018


    Presenters:

    Dayna Simon, Senior Counsel, Professional Conduct and Regulatory Affairs, Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario

    Lara Gertner, Counsel/Decision Writer, Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Professionals are required to conduct themselves in a manner that is appropriate and consistent with the written and unwritten standards of their profession. Professionalism can be demonstrated in the way a professional executes both their clinical skills and their soft skills. Soft skills, which include behaviours that relate to communication, ethical conduct and leadership, are recognized to have an impact on how the patient/client perceives the professional, as evidenced for example, in patient satisfaction surveys. It is increasingly evident that soft skills (or gaps in these skills) are related to patient complaints and subsequent disciplinary actions by regulators.


    The College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario (CRPO) recognizes that psychotherapists rely on soft skills to establish and manage effective therapeutic relationships. Indeed, a defining competency of the psychotherapy profession – safe and effective use of self – relies on highly developed soft skills in order that the competency can be performed consistently even in challenging conditions.


    We will share a continuing competence assessment methodology that highly emphasizes soft skills, explaining how this transfers to interview-based, written, and case-based examinations.


    Learning Objectives
    1. Recognize the value of assessing soft skills in continuing competence.
    2. Explore a step-by-step process for creating soft skills assessment tools that provide members/candidates with formative feedback.

    3. Apply this methodology to a case-study conducted by CPRO.


    Originally presented: October 2018


    Presenters:

    Lene Marttinen , Manager, Quality Assurance, College of Registered Psychotherapists of Ontario

    Leanne Worsfold, Director, Quality Programs and Test Development, iComp Consulting Inc.


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Receiving a complaint about their practice can be a stressful and worrying time for doctors, even more so when that complaint progresses to a full fitness to practice investigation. As part of its wider work to address issues around doctors’ wellbeing and stress, The General Medical Council (GMC) in the UK has made a range of changes to improve how it handles complaints and reduce the impact investigations can have on doctors.


    The improvements follow the GMC commissioning independent research into cases where doctors had died from suicide while subject to investigation over an eight year period. It later worked with a leading psychiatrist to carry out a detailed review of its investigation process from the point of view of the mental health of those involved. This led to a fundamental re-engineering of how it investigates doctors with a focus on ensuring investigations are only carried out where necessary, increasing the sensitivity of the process, and increasing support for those involved.


    In this webinar you will hear more background to this work and research, what changes have been introduced, and how the GMC hopes the reforms will help doctors.


    Originally presented: October 2018


    Presenter:

    Anna Rowland, Assistant Director of Policy, Business Transformation and Safeguarding, General Medical Council


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Journey with us down a difficult path as we examine an actual scenario where an appointed board member crossed professional and ethical boundaries bringing governance to its breaking point. Explore how to delicately approach the board member’s behavior and acquire some tools for analyzing what went wrong and then how to move forward to repair the damage that occurred with the licensees, board staff and the other board members due to one member’s personal vendetta.


    Originally presented: November 2018


    Presenter:

    Melanie deLeon, Executive Director, Washington Medical Commission


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Regulation, whether self- or legislatively imposed, contains specific requirements and processes to ensure public protection. What happens when those requirements and processes come under increased scrutiny from outside entities? How does a regulator manage to do the job they've been assigned, but also to meet the "needs" of public perception? Can regulators do both at the same time?


    View a full recording of the event held in Charleston, South Carolina on January 9, 2019 and hear from regulatory experts about the impact of public perception on regulatory bodies and ways in which regulators can think proactively to meet increased levels of scrutiny from members, legislators, and the public in general. From this presentation, you will have a plan you can use within your organization to meet these challenges head on. This on-demand recording includes a presentation/training by a marketing professional familiar with regulatory organizations, as well as real-life examples from regulators in the United States, Canada, and Ireland.


    View the full agenda for the event held here.


    Upon receipt of payment, you will receive an email with a link to the online recordings and handouts.  These links can be shared with other staff within your organization.


    Click here to see a sample of the recording


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    This webinar aims to facilitate a dynamic forum for the discussion of ethics, and both their practical and philosophical application in modern pharmacy practice. It will engage the participants with ethical scenarios and discussions on a range of ethical issues that pharmacists potentially face during their career. The session will also examine the recent development of a new Code of Ethics for Irish pharmacists, focusing on how it was developed, methods used, challenges encountered and how these were overcome. The webinar is presented by members of The Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland who were involved with the development of the new Code and is suitable for anyone involved in researching or planning to develop or revise a Code of Conduct or Ethics for any medical profession.


    Originally presented: February 2019


    Presenters:

    Conor O'Leary, Head of Pharmacy Practice Development Department, PSI – The Pharmacy Regulator of Ireland

    Róisín Cunniffe, Senior Pharmacist Advisor, PSI – The Pharmacy Regulator of Ireland


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Accepting that current regulatory models no longer achieve the goal of ensuring public confidence in the effective regulation of professions in the public interest, Canadian policy makers and regulatory leaders are searching for and implementing significant changes. In Ontario, the McMaster University Health Forum has released a thoroughly researched report on the future of health profession regulation that will likely form the basis for change across Canada. Meanwhile, the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society has begun implementing regulatory reform that regulators and academics alike are closely monitoring. A slew of additional studies and reports across the country are conveying a similar message. See the future now.


    Originally presented: February 2019


    Presenters:

    Richard Steinecke, Counsel, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

    Darrel Pink, Former Executive Director, Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society

    Rebecca Durcan, Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Approaching addictions and mental illness fairly, compassionately and in the public interest is a challenging task for regulators. This session will discuss the principle that should be at the forefront for regulators confronting vulnerable licensees who are facing discipline or capacity issues, including the unique statutory standards that apply in these types of situations. The speakers will then address the essential elements of a successful rehabilitation program to be completed in order to protect the public from the professional who begins the road to wellness. Finally, common pitfalls, slips and relapses will be addressed as they impact the success or failure to be rehabilitated and the immediate effect on the professional’s license to practice.


    Originally presented: March 2019


    Presenters:

    Robin McKechney, Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc
    Julie Maciura, Managing Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

    Susan Meyerle, Ethics Consultant, Life Resources, LLC


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Two regulators will discuss their experience with cultural competency, safety and humility in healthcare.


    Encouraging Cultural Competence: Oregon’s Approach - The modern physician’s oath includes a promise to not allow “considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor” to interfere with the patient relationship. At the same time, disparities exist among population groups in both health and access to care. The Oregon Medical Board sought to support its licensees in becoming more culturally responsive and providing compassionate care to all patients. The Oregon Medical Board’s proactive and educational approach to this important issue resulted in the award-winning publication, Cultural Competency: A Practical Guide for Medical Professionals.


    Cultural Safety and Humility in Health Care: a BC Regulator’s Journey - An extensive residential school system set up in 1870 by the Canadian government and administered by churches had a devastating long-term impact on the lives of Aboriginal people. To this day, Aboriginal people experience worse health outcomes, including shorter life expectancy, higher suicide rates and higher prevalence of chronic disease, than other Canadians as a result of systemic racism in the health system. In 2017, British Columbia’s 21 health regulators made a written pledge to the First Nations Health Authority declaring their commitment to cultural safety and humility in the health system. Dr. Heidi Oetter, registrar and CEO of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of BC, will share one regulator’s journey towards building awareness about cultural safety in health service delivery and implementing cultural humility in regulatory proceedings and day-to-day operations.


    Originally presented: March 2019


    Presenters:

    Nicole Krishnaswami, Executive Director, Oregon Medical Board

    Heidi M. Oetter, Registrar and CEO, College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    New research from the University of Waterloo studied non-urgent emergency department visits in Ontario and found that nearly one-third of such visits could have been managed by pharmacists with expanded scope of practice. The report notes that expanded scope for pharmacists in community practice or based in the Emergency Department could reduce crowdedness in EDs and allow for more ED resources to be devoted to care for more acute patients.


    Webinar objectives:

    • Provide an overview of expanded scope of practice for pharmacists in Canada
    • Give a summary of previous research studies that assessed the proportion of unnecessary emergency department visits in Canada and previous research studies that estimated the potential impact of expanded scope of practice on emergency department visits
    • Present the methods and results of a retrospective quantitative population-based observational cohort study performed in Ontario, Canada to: (1) Determine the proportion of avoidable ED visits that can potentially be managed by pharmacists within an expanded scope, (2) Determine the most prevalent conditions within these cases; and (3) Determine the factors associated with presenting to EDs with a case that is manageable by pharmacists.

    Originally presented: May 2019


    Presenter:

    Wasem Alsabbagh, Assistant Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    How do you investigate irregular behavior half a world away? Thanks to the advent of the internet and social media, investigating irregular behavior — cheating, fraud and related activities — by applicants has become easier in many ways but also poses new challenges. In this session, executives from the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG®) will provide strategies, tactics, case studies, and lessons learned from investigating irregular behavior in medical education all over the world. As a nonprofit, ECFMG has strived to develop a feasible investigative process that can be adapted to a wide range of irregular behaviors. The session will cover both online and in-person investigative tools, including web and social media, and how other professions and fields can adopt ECFMG’s practices for their own use.


    Originally presented: June 2019


    Presenter:

    Kara Corrado, Vice President for Operations, Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Michael Dugan and Eric Fish with Federation of State Medical Boards will describe work that FSMB is doing related to blockchain technologies and portable credentials. Through the use of blockchain technology, FSMB is enabling the use of trustless verification to reduce the cumbersome and time-consuming nature of multiple parties verifying the same information. Learn about promising blockchain technology pilot programs helping to drive future advances in regulation.


    Originally presented: July 2019


    Presenters:

    Michael Dugan, Chief Information Officer, Federation of State Medical Boards

    Eric Fish, Senior Director of Legal Services, Federation of State Medical Boards


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    This session will provide an overview of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution and how those amendments apply to administrative inspections and investigations conducted by regulatory boards. This session will discuss applicable case law from the U.S. Supreme Court, as well as several selected cases from states across the country involving regulatory inspections and investigations for a variety of licensed professions. The session will provide guidance in ensuring that a regulatory body’s statutes, regulations, inspection policies, and investigation policies are in compliance with the requirements of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments. Some discussion will also be included regarding the administrative warrant process, including identifying when obtaining an administrative warrant may be necessary.


    Originally presented: August 2019


    Presenter:

    Sarah Bradley, Senior Deputy Attorney General, Office of the Attorney General, State of Nevada


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Public choice theory has long been the dominant lens through which economists and other scholars have explained the origin and operation of occupational licensing. According to the public choice account, practitioners favor licensing because they want to reduce competition and drive up their own wages. Nunn and Scheffler argue that this account has been overstated and can distract from some of the most important harms of licensing, as well as from potential solutions. The authors then discuss three specific ways in which this is the case. Finally, Nunn and Scheffler describe findings from related research they have conducted, focusing on licensing revenues as well as issues specific to the health-care sector.


    Learning objectives:

    • Better understanding of the appropriate scope for public choice and other explanations of occupational licensure
    • Awareness of relevant evidence and research on the political economy of licensure
    • Better understanding of new research on licensing revenues and health-care policy

    Originally presented: September 2019


    Presenters:

    Ryan Nunn, Policy Director of The Hamilton Project, Brookings Institution

    Gabriel Scheffler, Associate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Regulators are told they need to apply risk management principles. What does that mean in the real world? Many regulators now apply regulatory risk in their day-to-day activities with some success. Moving beyond theory to practical application, this presentation discusses ten real-life examples of where avoiding risk of harm concepts are being (or are about to be) applied. The presenters will describe how regulators are truly identifying, analyzing, addressing and monitoring risk in a way that makes a difference to the public they protect.


    Originally presented: October 2019


    Presenters:

    Richard Steinecke, Counsel, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc
    Rebecca Durcan, Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    This webinar will explore how the UK’s General Medical Council (GMC) has been focusing on “upstream regulation,” early interventions that aim to prevent harm, as opposed to acting “downstream,” once harm has already occurred. GMC colleagues will explain some of the theory that informs their approach before sharing practical examples of what they are doing. This includes identifying risks by different cohorts of doctors and providing supportive teaching interventions to help them deliver the standards set in Good medical practice.


    Originally presented: October 2019


    Presenters:

    Tista Chakravarty-Gannon, Regional Liaison Adviser, General Medical Council

    Kim Tolley, Regional Liaison Service, Training Development Manager IGPR General Medical Council


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    The California Department of Consumer Affairs’ (DCA) mission is to protect Californians by providing a safe and fair marketplace through oversight, enforcement, and licensure of professions. To effectively carry out its mission, it collects a lot of data. DCA has over 3.5 million licensees, adds an additional 280,000 licensees per year, and processes over 80,000 consumer complaints per year. A variety of constituents and stakeholders have had an interest in this data for many years, and recently, through an investment in new technology and a commitment to data sharing and transparency, CA DCA has improved the quality and efficiency of the services it provides.


    Originally presented: December 2019


    Presenters:

    Sean O’Connor, Chief, Project Delivery and Administrative Services, California Department of Consumer Affairs

    Mischa Matsunami, Reports and Data Governance Supervisor, California Department of Consumer Affairs


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    This session will describe the journey of developing and implementing professional competencies in a regulatory context with an emphasis on cultural competence. Information will be presented from the occupational therapy boards of New Zealand and Australia. Each presentation will identify the catalyst for focusing on cultural competence of the jurisdictions and look at how competencies have been developed for regulatory use. The presenters will describe where they are on the journey and conclude with a view of the next steps. The session will have particular application for regulators who require registrants to demonstrate competence in delivering safe health services.


    Originally presented: January 2020


    Presenters:

    Julie Brayshaw, Board Chair, Occupational Therapy Board of Australia Andrew Charnock, CEO and Registrar, The Occupational Therapy Board of New Zealand


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    At a time when debates are ongoing about effective regulation, maintaining standards, and protecting the public interest, this session will focus on the ability of professional bodies to regulate their members. It follows a major and controversial report that proposed ending the Law Society of Scotland’s 70-year role in regulating Scottish solicitors in favor of a new and politically-appointed body. Does a profession-led mode of regulation still work, and, if so, how can it maintain public trust?


    Originally presented: February 2020


    Presenters:

    Kevin Lang, Executive Director of External Relations, Law Society of Scotland

    James Varro, Director, Office of the CEO and Corporate Secretary, Law Society of Ontario


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Public protection is the foundation of the mission of the regulatory agency. This session resumes the discussion of licensing authorities' developing role in engaging licensees by exploring the benefits of moving from a punitive role to one that seeks to return practitioners to safe and effective practice through targeted remediation and prevention. This session will challenge participants to explore the benefits of regulatory authorities adopting a remedial role in the protection of the public and provide tools to develop the remedial and preventative aspects of licensure.


    Originally presented: May 2020


    Presenters:

    Nancy Kirsch, President, Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy Richard Woolf, Vice President, Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    The Law Society of British Columbia established a Mental Health Task Force in January 2018. As a regulator, the Law Society has vowed to identify ways to reduce stigma and to review its discipline and admissions processes to consider how best to deal with mental health and substance use issues. This session will cover

    • the genesis and purpose of the Task Force;
    • the Task Force’s approach;
    • the work done and recommendations made to date by the Task Force;
    • reception of the Task Force’s work within the Law Society, the profession, government, and the public; and
    • the Task Force’s ongoing work and future plans.
    Originally presented: July 2020


    Presenter:

    Brook Greenberg, chair, Law Society of British Columbia Mental Health Task Force; partner, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP


    • 06 Apr 2100
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    Even before the traditional testing barriers (proctored exams) became a challenge with the Covid-19 pandemic, alternative assessment methods were being explored. As the world migrates towards a competency-based evaluation process, we shall sensibly explore the reality of what AI could bring with respect to making physical assessment decisions.


    This webinar presents a simple high level overview of the considerations for organisations if they elect to consider the use of AI, covering what assessment factors to consider, what might be possible, and what is probable.


    Originally presented: July 2020


    Presenter:

    Robert Smart, CEO, Vametric


    • 06 Apr 2100
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